ND-Burma Members’ Reports

Power through gun barrels: Abuses related to the DKBA offensive in Dooplaya District

Power through gun barrels: Abuses related to the DKBA offensive in Dooplaya District, April 23, 2009 I. Summary Since early October 2008, the current military junta and its ally, the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA) have been mounting a major military offensive to crush the Karen National Union (KNU) and its armed wing, the Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA). During 1997 and 1998, most of Dooplaya district in central Karen

Economic predation: taxation, extortion and commandeering in Mon State

Economic predation: taxation, extortion and commandeering in Mon State March 30, 2009I. Introduction The economic situation on Burma’s southern peninsula is demonstrative of the often spoke truisms about the interconnectedness of the globalized world economy. Though Burma’s foreign trade is limited by government mismanagement and international sanctions, it is still reliant on and impacted by changes in the international financial environment.

Living on a one-way ticket: self-reliance in the Mon resettlement sites

Living on a one-way ticket: self-reliance in the Mon resettlement sites February 26, 2009 I. Introduction The primary armed group fighting in the name of Mon people agreed to a cease-fire in 1995. Though this ended armed hostilities between the group and Burma’s State Peace and Development (SPDC) government, human rights abuses committed against residents of Burma’s southern peninsula continue. This abuse, combined with a weak economic situation directly related

Living between two fires

I. Introduction The mountains and thick jungle of the area between Mon State’s southern Ye Township and northern Yebyu District in northern Tenasserim Division make it an ideal staging ground for armed rebels. Burma’s State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) government’s desire to fully control the countryside – a desire strengthened by the proximity of gas pipelines – have lead to intense militarization of countryside as the government fights to

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Accompanying all the latest to-do over whether or not Burma’s regime is trying to obtain nuclear weapons has been the usual background noise about the menace of its conventional armed forces. Foreign pages’ editors excitedly describe the army as having half a million troops,

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Women in politics must combat the cultural landscape marked by male dominated households and political offices, which place women in the role of passive observer. Women are able to discuss the basic social issues, yet often are prohibited from decision making.  The women’s position is that of domestic caretaker, not policy maker.